We are off to a blazing start in 2015 here at ZingChart. We are just a few weeks into the new year, but we already found several great JavaScript charting and dataviz links to share.

zingchart and jquery together

jQuery chart love

Last week we released a jQuery wrapper/plugin for using ZingChart with jQuery syntax. And the response was great! We’ve been favorited and retweeted around the globe and we appreciate it very much.

In addition, the editorial staff at Byteswire included an article about the ZingChart jQuery wrapper in their editorial schedule, which we thank them for doing - www.byteswire.com/jquery-wrapper-for-zingchart-charting-library/

And the experts at Techslides updated the ZingChart listing in their JavaScript charting library list to include information about the jQuery wrapper - techslides.com/50-javascript-charting-and-graphics-libraries

We were also very lucky to be included in the latest list of JavaScript links from around the web, as compiled Peter Cooper in his JavaScript Weekly email newsletter:
JS weekly newsletter screenshot

Cool dataviz: chord diagram

We enjoyed exploring this interactive dataviz from Business Insider that visualized how many followers people lost on Instagram after they deleted inactive users and spam accounts.

screen shot of interactive chord diagram
Interestingly, Instagram lost the most followers!

New entries on JavaScript charting library lists

We are happy to share that ZingChart has been included in two more lists of JavaScript charting libraries/dataviz tools:

http://jqueryhouse.com/javascript-chart-and-graph-libraries/

http://www.infovis-wiki.net/index.php?title=SoftwareLinks(InfoVis_Applications)

Must-see JavaScript chart API content

Have you seen the new content on ZingChart about the powerful API?

screenshot of API demo
Don’t miss the interactive demo for using some basic methods and events, complete with a fiddle to see what’s happening behind the scenes.

Dataviz rules reminders

We can all use some gentle reminders about the rules we should follow for fair, usable dataviz. A recent article from Visual.ly does just that. They mention a lot of important items that we’ve discussed on the blog before, including:

What interesting links related to JavaScript charts and data visualization have you seen around the web lately? Share your favorites with us in the comments section below.